bbook

bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.

However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.

CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II

therarecreature

dreamsofteenmachines:

“This is kind of a song about the fact that sometimes people grow apart from each other, because they grow at a different pace or in a different way or because it just…the timing wasn’t right, or the circumstances weren’t right. And you come into an understanding that there is a love you share that is bigger than all of those things and it’s not necessarily going to work out in this lifetime, but maybe in the next one because the connection is strong enough that when you are born the next time, you will find that person again wherever that person is in the world.”

henrymcninja
streeter:

I’m glad the portrait of Ben Franklin stayed the same on the new $100 bill. There’s something about his slight, tight frown, the paternal hint of disappointment in his eyes and those pursed, sealed lips that seem to say, “I don’t approve of what you’re doing, but I can’t stop you from rolling this banknote into a straw and ripping a fat rail of white lightning in the Buffalo Wild Wings handicapped bathroom stall, you goddamn beautiful disaster.” 

streeter:

I’m glad the portrait of Ben Franklin stayed the same on the new $100 bill. There’s something about his slight, tight frown, the paternal hint of disappointment in his eyes and those pursed, sealed lips that seem to say, “I don’t approve of what you’re doing, but I can’t stop you from rolling this banknote into a straw and ripping a fat rail of white lightning in the Buffalo Wild Wings handicapped bathroom stall, you goddamn beautiful disaster.”